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FRONT ROOM MUSIC CATALOG
BURNING DAYLIGHT

2017 Americana Variety



Buy now for $14 through Paypal

BURNING DAYLIGHT VIDEO

TOO MANY TRAINS

MERCURY BLUES

I COUNT EACH HOUR

STANDBY WOMAN

AMAZING GRACE

WORKING WITH THE WOOD THEME

DALEY MAC (for Alan)

ALBUQUERQUE

NEVER TOO OLD


CREDITS:

Jim Stricklan ~ vocals, acoustic & electric guitars
George Coyne ~ electric and acoustic high-string guitars
Charles Ditto ~ piano, organ, vocal support
Steve Brooks ~ harmonica
Greg Lowry ~ dobro, banjo
Danny Hawk ~ steel guitar
Kevin Hall ~ drums, percussion
Dell Hollingsworth ~ bass > Mercury Blues
Mike Roberts ~ bass > Amazing Grace, Burning Daylight
Jamie Hilboldt ~ synth keys > Never Too Old
Leslie Stricklan ~ vocal support > Burning Daylight
Debi Witt Jones ~ vocal support > Burning Daylight
Candace Bellamy ~ vocal support > Amazing Grace

Recorded & mixed at Parrot Tracks Studio
Produced by Jim Stricklan & George Coyne
Photo at right by George Coyne of his mixing board
at Parrot Tracks for the mix on "Burning Daylight".


Design by Michelle Rahbar, Mothership Arts – Austin, TX
Front Cover watercolor painting by Rick Stricklan
For info on his paintings, contact him at rickstricklan@gmail.com
Photo of Jim @ Parrot Tracks by George Coyne
Water color interpretation
by Michelle Rahbar.
For more info on her artwork, reach her through mothershiparts.com
All songs by Jim Stricklan © 2016 Front Room Music except:
Albuquerque by Neil Young,
Mercury Blues by KC Douglas, and
Standby Woman by Larry Rothwell - used by permission.
Amazing Grace by John Newton [1779] - public domain; arrangement by Jim Stricklan.

Released by Kokobilly Music, a subsidiary of Front Room Music
All rights reserved.


LINER NOTES:

In a way, I began preparing for this—my 30th studio album--back in 1963, at the age of sixteen. That’s when I wrote “I Count Each Hour,” the first of a half dozen songs penned during my teens. The following year, I stepped into a small booth in an Oklahoma City penny arcade, deposited some change and recorded the song! That small souvenir lacquer only lasted a few months, but the song refused to be forgotten. We recorded this version last spring.

Around 1977 I was living up in Denver, working as a radio DJ and playing my newly penned songs at the local coffee houses. “Too Many Trains" was one I worked up on 12-string guitar, performed a few times, then stashed away until the dismal politics of 2016-17 prompted me to put it on this record. I’m a longtime fan of Neil Young, so I added his “Albuquerque” to the roster, using George’s vintage Guild 12-string; playing the instrument with osteoarthritis was a serious challenge.

Larry Rothwell’s “Standby Woman,” first made its way to my 1980 (LP), titled Whereabouts Unknown. Shortly after Larry died of cancer, I decided to give the song another whirl. Thanks to Charles Ditto (keyboards) and Danny Hawk (steel guitar), for helping me revive the honky-tonk feel thirty years later. “Daley Mac” is a simple tribute to my pal, Alan McClinton, my roommate at Texas Tech! Alan and I sacked groceries before going off to college and we still love listening to great music together.

Despite all the covers of “Mercury Blues” over the years, the original by KC Douglas from 1951, has remained my favorite. My thanks to George Coyne and Dell Hollingsworth for making this one come alive in the studio and at our live shows. Dell and I share music roots from our teenage rock band days out in Big Spring, Texas! She played in Lyen Roc with Steve Holley and Mike Colclazer, while Sally Townes and I fronted the Mojo Hand way back then. It’s so hard to believe that was fifty years ago!

I wrote and recorded “Never Too Old,” at my home studio in 2001, and released the original version on Daydreamer 1--from the Daydreamer box-set featuring my home recordings. Jamie Hilboldt added synth strings to give “Never Too Old” the enhanced sound I was looking for. Greg Lowry spiced up several of the tracks on this CD with his flawless dobro work, on “Amazing Grace,” the “WWW Theme,” and “I Count Each Hour.” Greg also picked the banjo on my tribute to “Daley Mac.”

The title track, “Burning Daylight” was written last year, out of desperation for the tragic political state of affairs and the dangerous threat to democracy that has seemingly gained control of America. I don't write much anymore but I’m compelled to sing out about this national disaster. Recording this song took many months and 24-tracks to capture my angst, along with the talents of all the fine players who joined me. We celebrate love, music, and freedom…with liberty and justice for ALL.

My wonderful first cousin Rick Stricklan, himself an accomplished musician, prefers to paint his songs onto canvas, using watercolors. And in my humble opinion, he is among the best American painters. I’m deeply honored that he allowed me to feature one of his paintings as the cover of this CD. Thanks cuz! And, my thanks to Michelle Rahbar at Mothership Arts for her consistently excellent album designs.

Jim
March 2017

PS from Leslie: This was very nearly a posthumous album. Thankfully, Jim is still with us to keep making and sharing his music, with more new songs ahead.
As "Too Tall" liked to say, "Stay Tuned!"


LYRICS:


BURNING DAYLIGHT (Words and music by Jim Stricklan, 2016)

Children of the Wilderness, we’ve been away too long—
Tried to conquer gravity, the pull was just too strong;
We found our way to Paradise, it all went up in smoke-
When truths we held self-evident turned out to be a joke.

Burning daylight ~ it comes as no surprise,
Evil is as evil does, no matter the disguise;
Burning daylight ~ with darkness coming on,
Children of the Wilderness, we’ve been away too long.

Listen to the susurrus among the Aspen trees—
Like voices of the angels, floating gently on the breeze;
Nature keeps her promises, unlike the word of man-
Time is of the essence now that greed is out of hand.

Burning daylight ~ it comes as no surprise,
Evil is as evil does, no matter the disguise;
Burning daylight ~ with darkness coming on,
Children of the Wilderness, we’ve been away too long.



TOO MANY TRAINS (Words and music by Jim Stricklan, 1977)

Too many trains rollin' down the same railroad tracks,
Too many mokeys on too many people's backs;
Too many poison rumours, too many off-white lies,
Too many danger birds flyin' the friendly skies.

Oh you of little faith, you never listen anyway—
Will the answers come far beyond the grave?
Gold diggers and social clowns,
Fill your pockets and stand your ground,
In AMERICA, the Home of the Brave.

Too many trials have faded the smile
Upon the face of the Statued Lady,
Standing in the New York Bay.
Too many empty oil fields, too many empty souls,
As the Seasons turn, and the Prophecies unfold.

Oh you of little faith, you never listen anyway—
Will the answers come far beyond the grave?
Gold diggers and social clowns,
Fill your pockets and stand your ground,
In AMERICA, the Home of the Brave.

Too many trains rollin' down the same railroad tracks,
Too many mokeys on too many people's backs;



I COUNT EACH HOUR (Words and music by Jim Stricklan, 1963)

I count each hour that passes by—
They seem like years now, I wonder why?
If you don’t love me, what can I do?
I count each hour and think of you.

You can’t deny dear, I love you so—
If you would call me, then you would know;
I count each hour and always pray,
That you’ll return dear, to me someday.

[Instrumental break]

Repeat 1st verse and turnaround

Jim's note: I wrote "I Count Each Hour" in 1963 and recorded it acapella the next year on a lacquer disc in a penny arcade booth at the Spring Lake Amusement Park in OKC. The disc was lost during my college years.



STANDBY WOMAN Words and music by Larry M. Rothwell, 1980)

He’s a hero in his own mind to the ladies
On the last flight in to Midland—
He’s had a few too many rounds,
Now and then he’s apt to see a vision…
Of grander schemes and all you beautiful dames,
But all he can muster
Is a last stand like Custer
Did, and dies.

He’s hard-pressed for ready cash,
He’s got the card that lets him spend it anyway;
He can fill your hungry mind with dreams,
But he just can’t find the time to say…
how he feels inside,
That you’re so pretty tonight;
Then you’re just a standby woman,
So I, guess it’s alright.



DALEY MAC for Alan McClinton (Words and music by Jim Stricklan, 2009)

Daley Mac, Daley Mac, now and then I get to lookin’ back—
At them early Texas summers and the the groceries that we
sacked;
Drivin’ them ’60 Chevrolets…
Rollin’ round Big Spring, back in the good ole days.

Daley Mac, Daley Mac, I was thinkin’ what the heck—
If I’m goin’ off to college, might as well be Texas Tech;
Somehow we did survive it all,
Listenin' to Johnny Dark—back in old Sneed Hall.

I still love Denver but it sure gave me the blues—
Seems like the hard road is the one I always choose.

[Break and repeat bridge]

Daley Mac, Daley Mac, hey, I guess we had a blast—
Playin’ all them records was the best part of my past;
I don’t where where the time has flown,
Al, you’re the best pal, this old boy has ever known.

Repeat 1st verse.






NEVER TOO OLD (to Rock n’ Roll) (Words and music by Jim Stricklan, 2001)

Took my old amp out the other day,
I plugged it in and I started to play—
A bunch of Beatles and Rolling Stones
Some of Buddy’s and a few of my own

Cause you’re never too old to rock n’ roll,
No matter what they say;
If you believe that magic never goes away—
Then you’re never too old to rock n’ roll.

I still crank it up but not too loud,
And after midnight, well three’s a crowd;
She takes my hand as the lights go out, and says,
“Come on baby, let’s twist and shout.”

Cause you’re never too old to rock n’ roll,
No matter what they say;
If you believe that magic never goes away—
Then you’re never too old to rock n’ roll.

I keep my memories down the hall with the old 45s—
They had a sock hop down at the mall,
Maybe Elvis is still alive…

I hear these kids playing all over town,
With power chords and that hip hop sound;
I have to smile while they take their turn,
There’s still a thing or two they could learn
(Repeat chorus to end)




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